DOUG HORNE

Tsawout artist Douglas Horne was born in 1982 to Kathy Horne and Doug LaFortune. Growing up in a family of artists, Doug was exposed to his cultural traditions and art from birth.  His artistic teachings began in 1998 Perry and Francis Horn, as well as his father Doug LaFortune.

Douglas works in Coast Salish style, but enjoys exploring the unconventional.  He works primarily with red and yellow cedar, and is known for his signature winking owl sculptures and poles.Tsawout artist Douglas Horne was born in 1982 to Kathy Horne and Doug LaFortune. Growing up in a family of artists, Doug was exposed to his cultural traditions and art from birth. His artistic teachings began in 1998 Perry and Francis Horn, as well as his father Doug LaFortune.​Douglas works in Coast Salish style, but enjoys exploring the unconventional. He works primarily with red and yellow cedar, and is known for his signature winking owl sculptures and poles.

Frog & Eagle Pole by Doug Horne

C$6,000.00Price
  • EAGLE

     

    Eagle represents vision, peace, friendship and prosperity. Eagle feathers are very sacred, and are used in ceremonies. Eagles are commonly depicted with Salmon, as they have excellent fishing skills. As Eagles are unable to release their talons mid-flight, they have been known to drown if they choose too large and powerful a fish to grab onto. Eagle is very noble and is often described as having a moral conscience in Legend. Eagle Down is cherished and highly valued for use in ceremony.

     

    In Haida society, one is born to either the Eagle or the Raven clan. Each clan carries a number of crests, some of which are shared, and some of which are exclusive. As one must always marry outside of their clan, Eagle and Raven together represent love.

     

    Eagles are depicted with a short curved beak, and sometimes have an appendage on the head. When Eagle has an appendage, he is easy to confuse with Thunderbird – but Thunderbird’s appendage is curled on the end, making it quite distinct and recognizable.

     

    FROG

     

    Frogs warn humans of imminent danger. Frogs represent stability, foundations and communication, which correlate with environmental observations about contamination and a worrisome decline in frog populations. Frog and Salmon both represent fertility in different regions along the coast. As a creature who lives in both water and on land, Frog is respected for being adaptable and knowledgeable. He is an important assistant to medicine men.

     

    Frog faces are depicted with large round or oval eyes, tiny nostrils and long, closed lips that are often smiling and sometimes have a protruding tongue. The tongue represents transfer of knowledge. Frog is most recognizable when the whole body is shown, as the front and hind legs have webbed feet.​​

     

    SOURCES

    Cheryl Shearar Understanding Northwest Coast Art  (2000)

    Campbell River Museum & Archives

    Jay Miller Tsimshian Culture:  A Light Through the Ages  (2000)