NOEL BROWN

 

Coast Salish & Kwakwaka’wakw artist Noel Brown was born to Donna and Jerry Brown in Snuneymuxw (Nanaimo) on Vancouver Island.

 

Noel gained an interest in First Nations art as a young child, and began learning when he was young under his cousins Richard and Matthew Baker, Chris and Doran Lewis and Craig Manson. Brown credits James Christopher Lewis as being his main inspiration for why he started carving in 1995.

 

Brown has collaborated on large scale Totem Poles, creates drum designs and pieces that are used in the Big House, and also creates art pieces for the art market. Brown can often be found crafting custom pieces of jewellery, which has become his full time passion and career. 

Brown created beautiful pieces as a fundraiser for "Walking with our Sisters" in 2016, and continues to craft beautiful pieces in wood, sterling silver and gold.  His Coast Salish designs are special to see, as Coast Salish jewellery is still less seen than other styles on the coast.  

If you would like to custom order a piece by Noel Brown, please contact us for more information!

 

Turquoise Hummingbird Ring by Noel Brown

C$200.00Price
  • HUMMINGBIRD

     

    Exclusive to the Western Hemisphere, Hummingbird is an agile feminine bird known for grace, beauty, love and joy. Hummingbirds can hover in the air without seeming to fly, but have swift movement and are quick to respond to danger. Hummingbirds are affiliated with emotional healing, and are seen as a good omen if one appears during a time of strife or sorrow. Fragile and sensitive to her surroundings, Hummingbirds are a reminder of the delicate nature of life.

     

    Hummingbirds are generally depicted with tiny, fragile bodies, long slender beaks, and either a single or cluster of flowers. Hummingbird is sometimes illustrated with curled appendages similar to that of Thunderbird, though more delicate. That said, it is impossible to mistake Hummingbird for Thunderbird, due to the obvious differences between their beaks.

     

    SOURCES

    Cheryl Shearar Understanding Northwest Coast Art  (2000)

    Conversations with various artists