GILBERT PAT

 

Gilbert Pat was born in November 1945 in Sardis BC, located in Sto:lo territory of the Fraser Valley. Pat was educated in Mission, but relocated to the ‘Namgis village of ‘Yalis (Alert Bay) as a young man, where he married Francis Shaughnessy. During his time in Alert Bay, Pat was inspired and mentored by well-known carver Lloyd Wadhams Sr of Kingcome Inlet.

 

Pat developed his own geometric interpretation of coastal form line, and produces clean, consistent, quality pieces of jewellery for an affordable price.

Our most popular of Pat's work includes some delicate horizontal bar pieces that are punched on either end, to be suspended from a link chain.  Pat has also designed some gorgeous vertical pendants with the top bent back, rather than having jump hoops to suspend them on chain.  Feminine, delicate and shiny, with meaningful motifs, make these wonderful gifts.

 

His two sons Jason and Jeff are also proficient jewelers who have been deeply influenced by Pat’s style

Wolf Earrings by Gilbert Pat

C$80.00Price
  • WOLF

     

    The Kwa’wala word for Wolf is u’ligan. Wolf is the ancestor of the Dzawada’enuxw people of Gwa’yi (Kingcome Inlet) and the Haxwa’mis of Wakeman Sound. Historical accounts speak of the wolf who survived the great flood by ascending a high mountain, and began howling to see if anyone would answer. It was the Gusgimukw who answered the call and this was when wolves changed into men and became the ancestors of the Dzawada’enuxw and Haxwa’mis. Though the wolf dance was not shared for many years outside of the family, it has now been gifted to several families from other villages that now have rights to the Wolf Dance and its forty songs. 

     

    Often viewed as sly and cunning, clever Wolf is a storyteller known for valuing kinship. The social organization of wolves is very similar to both Killer Whales and Humans, as they mate for life and travel in packs. They are fierce protectors of their young, and cooperate as a team. 

     

    Abstract Wolf and Bear designs can look quite similar, so always look for a long snout, a small, elegant paw, and a long tail vs a short snout, claw and short tail seen on bear designs.

    SOURCES

    Franz Boas Indian Myths & Legends from the North Pacific Coast of America: A Translation of Franz Boas' 1895 Edition of Indianische Sagen von der Nord-Pacifischen Kuste Amerikas (2006)​

    Campbell River Museum & Archives​

    U'mista Cultural Centre Museum Online Resources